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27 comments:

  1. This is a brilliant blog and should be accessed by all those concerned about the worrying number of wind factories up and running and proposed for this area.

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  2. Victoria Boyle said...
    This is a brilliant blog and should be accessed by all those concerned about the worrying number of wind factories up and running and proposed for this area.


    Victoria, thanks for taking the time to complement and comment on the blog. Its sad that I have to post about such bleak things, but perhaps with this blog some more people will sit up and take note of what is going on.

    Check back again soon or subscribe using your favourite method to get automatic update notifications.

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  3. Excellent and informative blog, especially the extremely good map showing the potentially vast spread of wind farms in this part of South West Scotland.

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  4. Excellent and informative blog, especially the extremely good map showing the potentially vast spread of wind farms in this part of South West Scotland.

    Harriet, thank you for the feedback. Unfortunately, there is much more to come on the blog, and a bit more on the map! And yes, the area of blue is becoming rather large - must total it up some day.

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  5. An excellent and informative blog - thank you for all the information you've put in one place. It clearly shows the cumulative impact on South Ayrshire. I look foward to more blogs and have a personal interest in reading more about the possible health implications of living in close proximity to wind factories, so will be coming back regularly.

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  6. An excellent and informative blog - thank you for all the information you've put in one place. It clearly shows the cumulative impact on South Ayrshire. I look foward to more blogs and have a personal interest in reading more about the possible health implications of living in close proximity to wind factories, so will be coming back regularly.

    Thank you for your comments. I have a series of posts planned that highlight the growing body of peer-reviewd scientific papers relating to the adverse health impacts of these developments. I hope the blog continues to be of use to you.

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  7. Fanastic blog, most informative and so well put together. Nice to have all this information in the one place, thanks for taking the time to do this.

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  8. Fanastic blog, most informative and so well put together. Nice to have all this information in the one place, thanks for taking the time to do this.

    David, thank you for your complements - such praise means a lot. I hope to continue to expand the quantity and quality of data and information made available through this blog over the coming months, and my hope in doing so is that it will become a useful source of reference and information for as many people as possible - locally, regionally and nationally.

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  9. I was born and bred in Ayrshire. I studied Physics at Glasgow University and then had to move south to find a job in England because there were no job opportunities in Scotland. Only 2 of the 54 people on my Physics course got jobs in Scotland. So it INFURIATES me when people oppose windfarms because it will spoil the nice view. Scotland has an abundance of great scenery. What it doesn't have is enough jobs for its young people. Renewable energy is the future and windfarms are a stepping stone towards that future.
    I can only assume that the objectors prefer the option of Nuclear waste dumped in the hills around Loch Doon (don't forget that it was only 34 years ago that this was being planned as an option!). A windmill can be easily dismantled, but radioactive waste will haunt us forever. I am posting anonymously only because I have previously spoken out in favour of windfarms and was bombarded with vindictive emails.

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  10. I was born and bred in Ayrshire. I studied Physics at Glasgow University and then had to move south to find a job in England because there were no job opportunities in Scotland. Only 2 of the 54 people on my Physics course got jobs in Scotland. So it INFURIATES me when people oppose windfarms because it will spoil the nice view. Scotland has an abundance of great scenery. What it doesn't have is enough jobs for its young people. Renewable energy is the future and windfarms are a stepping stone towards that future.
    I can only assume that the objectors prefer the option of Nuclear waste dumped in the hills around Loch Doon (don't forget that it was only 34 years ago that this was being planned as an option!). A windmill can be easily dismantled, but radioactive waste will haunt us forever. I am posting anonymously only because I have previously spoken out in favour of windfarms and was bombarded with vindictive emails.


    Thank you for your feedback - and I understand why you posted anonymously. I am NOT opposed to wind farms, they most certainly have a role to play in our future energy mix. However, what this blog is about is the inappropriate industrialisation of vast tracts of landscape by companies who are only interested in profit. I also have a problem with the fact that the location of these wind farms is left almost entirely to market forces - locations are chosen with profitability firmly in mind, and little else. Finally, there is the the issue of a complete lack of planning by the Scottish Government in terms of our future energy mix - for example, where will our base load capacity come from when 3 out of the 4 base load power stations cease operations by 2020?

    The jobs created by these construction projects are few in number and very transient in nature. Tourism revenue in Dumfries and Galloway is already declining as a direct result of what is happening with wind farms. Scotland has 10% of the population of England and 60% of the land mass; why are these wind farms being located in some of the most sensitive areas we have?

    I would like to think you will stop by from time to time as this blog develops; perhaps you will change your mind, but I respect your opinions - you have as much right to them as I have to mine.

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  11. Mark, you are doing a great public service through your efforts in creating and maintaining this incredibly informative blog and resource reference.

    I would also like to respond to the anonymous physicist :
    I am a fellow physicist, also born and raised in Scotland, now living and working in Ayrshire. Before criticising people who object to wind farms, please take the time to investigate the FACTS, like you would with any other techonology. If you look into what is happening in detail, then still decide you are in favour of wind farms all over the place, then fine, but at least you will be able to argue from a concrete and rational point of view, backing up your argument with solid numbers.
    The problem with the wind farm debate is that it is totally political and financial. The technical pros and cons are NOT understood by the politicians, who by and large are not even numerate, never mind scientifcally literate. Thus those who stand to gain financially (developers and land owners) are skewing the debate unfairly and in many cases produce totally misleading information.

    Please also note : Scotland has a significant tourism business, thus our scenic areas are actually extremely valuable, and are sustainable, but not if we put turbines all over the most scenic areas. If you think I am being alarmist, you should really take a look at some of the wind farm proposals - they might shock you.

    Before you comment further about people complaining, you might also want to experiment by spending a night trying to sleep within 650 meters of a huge turbine . . . . . that might open your eyes to the predicament of many rural house owners in Scotland whose health is deteriorating due to lack of sleep and whose house is now worth nothing and cannot be sold . . . .

    Wind farms have a part to play in a balanced mix of renewable energy resources, but right now they are simply subsidy-farms, skewing the market and generating proposals in totally inappropriate areas.

    Please put your scientific training to good use and apply it to the analysis of wind-farming in Scotland. It may open your eyes and shock you, like it did with me.

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  12. Mark, you are doing a great public service through your efforts in creating and maintaining this incredibly informative blog and resource reference.

    Thank you for taking the time to post this encouragement, it really means a tremendous amount to me. It is still very early days for this blog, and in time I would like to think that it will become a useful reference for the whole of Scotland, since what is happening in this particular area is also going on in a great many other places. There is a great deal more information I will be making available here, some of it with local significance, some of it with national significance. I can only hope more people approach this situation with your frame of mind, educate themselves to this folly - and then perhaps try and make their voices heard - above the noise!

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  13. Excellent Blog. Well put together and clear. Thank you.

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  14. Excellent Blog. Well put together and clear. Thank you.

    Thank you for your comment, and sorry for delaying you feedback - I wanted to keep comments and responses next to each other!

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  15. I agree with Victoria and the others. This is an excellent blog and must have taken a serious amount of work. Well done - loads of information.
    I have only just found it after seeing the proposed development above Lendalfoot at the Straid Farm. That was a real shock. I'm not against green energy (though I still remain unconvinced about the long term benefits and value of windfarms) what I am against is the greed which is driving people and companies into placing turbines anywhere they can so they can access the pot of gold at the end of the process.
    The Straid Farm planning application is a classic example.
    I am also not against English people - some of my very best friends hail from South of the border - but why are we allowing a company from Stroud in
    Gloucestershire to mess up our countryside?
    Keep up the good work.

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  16. I agree with Victoria and the others. This is an excellent blog and must have taken a serious amount of work. Well done - loads of information.
    I have only just found it after seeing the proposed development above Lendalfoot at the Straid Farm. That was a real shock. I'm not against green energy (though I still remain unconvinced about the long term benefits and value of windfarms) what I am against is the greed which is driving people and companies into placing turbines anywhere they can so they can access the pot of gold at the end of the process.
    The Straid Farm planning application is a classic example.
    I am also not against English people - some of my very best friends hail from South of the border - but why are we allowing a company from Stroud in
    Gloucestershire to mess up our countryside?
    Keep up the good work.


    Robert, thanks for your comments - and yes Straid has to be up there as one of the most ill-conceived wind farms in the area. A lot of people, like myself agree with your position in terms of renewable energy - and the greed factor!

    I find it interesting you mention the English connection in reference to Straid. A post I will be making soon may interest you about just who owns or will own these wind farms - very few are English, Scottish or even British.

    Stop by again soon - there'll be plenty more to read!

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  17. This is a fantastic information source with some breathtaking statistics bringing home the threat to our economy and environment by the destruction of our main tourism resource - our beautiful landscape. As Mark Hill turbines stand still for a second week and we are forecast another cold winter (which stopped HHill turbines for weeks last year) how can anyone believe wind power will keep the lights on?

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  18. This is a fantastic information source with some breathtaking statistics bringing home the threat to our economy and environment by the destruction of our main tourism resource - our beautiful landscape. As Mark Hill turbines stand still for a second week and we are forecast another cold winter (which stopped HHill turbines for weeks last year) how can anyone believe wind power will keep the lights on?

    Thank you Claire. The statistics are indeed a serious eye opener - and so is the fact that all of this information is 'publicly available' - but largely invisible; the age of democracy has now virtually vanished. For example, how can a development the size of Kilgallioch (17,000 acres) be virtually unknown by the public? I think the penny will eventually drop, but by then it will be too late - the lights may actually stay on, but the price that we will pay will be enormous, both in monetary and environmental terms.

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  19. Great resource. I've added a few links to it from my own web site "www.renewables-map.co.uk" which I see you link to.

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  20. Great resource. I've added a few links to it from my own web site "www.renewables-map.co.uk" which I see you link to.

    Simon, thank you for your comment - and the reciprocal links.

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  21. I read somewhere that the way electricity is produced by wind turbines is by way of the use of a squirrel cage motor which is a power amplifier i.e. small amount of electricity in, larger amount of electricity out. The problem is, that because the wind tends to gust the output continually fluctuates, making it difficult to maintain the output voltage and the frequency stable, thus producing “dirty” electricity, which when enough was fed into the national grid would pollute the electricity supply and effect more sensitive electronic systems adversely. Is this true?

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  22. I read somewhere that the way electricity is produced by wind turbines is by way of the use of a squirrel cage motor which is a power amplifier i.e. small amount of electricity in, larger amount of electricity out. The problem is, that because the wind tends to gust the output continually fluctuates, making it difficult to maintain the output voltage and the frequency stable, thus producing “dirty” electricity, which when enough was fed into the national grid would pollute the electricity supply and effect more sensitive electronic systems adversely. Is this true?

    I know there are a number of turbine/gerabox designs (constant speed, variable speed etc) each with their own output characteristics. Some do produce electricity whose frequency varies, others smooth their output. I therefore cannot give a general answer to your question since it depends upon the type of turbine being used. However, ultimately, it is the National Grid who have to sort out the frequency of the supply. There is a tolerance on the supply frequency that they work to, and electrical equipment should be manufactured to standards that can accommodate this tolerance. Perhaps not much help, but then again I'm not an engineer! Sorry!

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  23. Hello Mark. I just wanted to say thanks for keeping the information flowing and I find it very useful to see the wider picture of what is happening around the south west.
    I hope our planners and politicians are using the site to update themselves.

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  24. Hello Mark. I just wanted to say thanks for keeping the information flowing and I find it very useful to see the wider picture of what is happening around the south west.
    I hope our planners and politicians are using the site to update themselves.


    Claire, thanks for the kind words. It would be nice to think that politicians were indeed educating themselves, I think though, the reality is that we will have to educate them. The fact that few of them truly have any idea about what is really going on was demonstrated in the recent Holyrood debate; the members of the public attending the debate outnumbered the MSPs by a very large margin demonstrating a complete disconnect between the politicians and the people they are supposed to represent. As far as many of the politicians are concerned - things are 'going well' and if we ever want to change that view, it will be up to us to find the necessary information and lay it at their feet.

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  25. Think the new turbine markers on the map are better - easier to see, and makes it appallingly clear at a glance just how much land is being covered. Not only the ground they are built on is affected, but of course huge surrounding areas also suffer from the visual pollution. Also fully agree with your blog re the Broad Areas of Search. Heartbreaking to see what is happening to Scotland, and all for so little benefit.

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  26. Think the new turbine markers on the map are better - easier to see, and makes it appallingly clear at a glance just how much land is being covered. Not only the ground they are built on is affected, but of course huge surrounding areas also suffer from the visual pollution. Also fully agree with your blog re the Broad Areas of Search. Heartbreaking to see what is happening to Scotland, and all for so little benefit

    Thank you Harriet. The vast swathes of land that could be gobbled up by these developments should be of great concern to at least everybody that lives in the area - but ideally anybody who really cares for the a non-industrialised landscape. Sadly, few look beyond their immediate environment - so it is up to us to try and "get their minds right"!

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  27. I would like to share my objection to the Straid Wind Farm in Lendalfoot. I am in full support of the Carelton Bay Association in their efforts to have what can only be described as a monstosity built in an area of such beauty.

    I may not live in the area, but Lendalfoot is my spiritual home, and has been since I was first taken there over 50 years ago by my Mother and Father. The village gets a great deal of visitors to the area for many reasons, bird watchers, Geologists, as well as people who just love the diversity of wildlife and countryside the area has to offer.

    My wish is that South Ayrshire council see some sense and realise that the landscape that draws people to their region is the very thing they will destroy by having these turbines all over this unique and beautiful coastline.

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